Archive for February, 2019

Ambient dose rates caused by different types of radiation

February 8th, 2019

Ambient dose equivalent H*(d) is the normal monitoring (area monitoring) quantity for X, gamma and neutron radiation where d is the depth at which the dose applies. International convention in radiation protection is to use the ambient dose equivalent at 10 mm depth i.e. H*(10). The ambient dose gives a conservative estimate of the effective dose a person would receive when staying at the point of the monitoring instrument (NPL).
In Nucleonica applications, the photon (X+gamma), beta, and neutron doses are calculated separately using analytical and semi-analytical formulae. To obtain the (total) ambient dose H*(d), these individual doses must be added. Following Otto, the ambient dose from a radionuclide can be represented as a sum of components caused by different radiation types, i.e.
ADR_Radiations3This is the notation which will be used in various Nucleonica applications for ambient doses and dose rates i.e.
ADR_Radiations4
For control of doses to skin and lens of eye, the directional dose equivalent is used. The directional dose equivalent denoted by H′(d) is intended for use with less penetrating radiation such a beta particles. Its main use is for skin dose at a depth of 0.07 mm. For beta radiation and electrons, for example, this is denoted as i.e. H'(0.07)e.
ADR_Radiations6

More info…
– T. Otto, Personal Dose-Equivalent Conversion Coefficients for 1252 Radionuclides, Radiation Protection Dosimetry (2016), Vol. 168, No .1, pp1-70. Link
NPL: Measurement of dose rate
Operational quantities (Wikipedia)

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