Archive for the ‘Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart’ Category

New 11th Edition (2022) of the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart

March 8th, 2022

The 11th Edition 2022 of the “Karlsruher Nuklidkarte” contains new and updated radioactive decay and thermal neutron cross sections data on 1035 nuclides (82 new nuclides) not found in the previous (2018) edition. In total, nuclear data on 4122 experimentally observed ground states and isomers are presented.KNCO11 All thermal fission chain yield data for 235U and 239Pu (with 16 new mass chains) has been updated using the latest values from JEFF3.3 radioactive decay data file from 2018. The thermal neutron cross sections data in nuclide boxes has been also actualized based on the sixth edition of the Atlas of Neutron Resonances (Volume 1-2, author: S.F. Mughabghab, published by Elsevier in 2018).
Most recent values of the atomic weights, isotopic abundances and cross sections are included together with the thermal fission yields for both 235U and 239Pu. For thirteen elements, a range of atomic weights is given to reflect the isotopic variability in natural materials. The accompanying booklet again contains the multi-lingual “Explanation of the Chart of the Nuclides” in English, German, French and Spanish, updated to reflect changes in the Chart. The Reduced Decay Schemes section initiated in previous editions, and used to describe in detail how the nuclide box contents should be interpreted with reference to the nuclide decay schemes, has been considerably expanded.
This new 11th Edition of the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart is the result of a collaboration between Zsolt Sóti from the EC’s Joint Research Centre and Joseph Magill and Raymond Dreher from the Nucleonica team. The online version of the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart is available through the Nucleonica nuclear science portal (www.nucleonica.com).

More info…
Online shop
Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart, 11th Edition 2022

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Nucleonica Chat

February 14th, 2022

Nucleonica Chat is a communication software tool developed by the Nucleonica Team to provide easy and spontaneous communication between members of the Nucleonica community (either online or offline) while using the Nucleonica apps. Users may exchange results of calculations, their experience with applications and so on through short messages reinforced by emojis or send files up to a length of 2 MB while working with Nucleonica.
The recipients can be selected from a drop down list of the online users, or from a user selection tool.
Chat posts can also be sent directly to the administrators (for questions, report bugs etc.). In summary, users can send message to:
– all online users (from the users online listed in the drop-down menu)
– all online colleagues (all users from the same organisation)
– offline users (using the Search User button)
– administrators (using the entry in the drop-down menu)
ChatUsers can also directly reply to a user message by clicking on the “From User to me” in the main Chat message window. Files (mixtures, gamma spectra, etc.) can be selected and conveniently uploaded to the selected user.
The chat area presents in chronological order a maximum of 50 messages from the past 100 days, depending on which limit is reached first.

Nucleonica Chat

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JEFF-3.3 (2017) decay data now available in Nucleonica

July 12th, 2021

On November 20, 2017, the JEFF-3.3 datafile was released by the NEA.
The JEFF-3.3 (2017) decay data sublibrary is now available in Nucleonica in addition to the previously used decay data libraries JEFF3.1, EBDF/B-VII.1, and ENDF/B-VIII. It is now possible to compare and contrast the main European (JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.3) and American (ENDF/BVII.1, ENDF/B-VIII.0) data libraries for differences in half-lives, branching ratios, energies and emission probabilities of the emitted radiations, fission yields, etc. using Nucleonica’s user friendly tools. This data comparison can be accessed through the Options tab of the Nuclide Datasheets++ application.

Reference: JEFF-3.3

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Nucleonica Newsletter 2020

January 2nd, 2020

Happy New Year!
2019 in Review
Dear Nucleonica Users,
Hopefully you had a great start into the New Year, and we wish you every success in 2020. For the Nucleonica Team, a major focus over the past year was again the development and improvement of new and existing applications. Detailed information on these activities is described in this Newsletter. Some highlights were:
– In connection with the United Nations designation of 2019 as the international year of the periodic table of the chemical elements, a new paper on the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart was published.
– A further highlight was the updating of the Nucleonica physical constants to the latest CODATA recommended values.
– The Nuclear Security Exercises developed jointly with the Federal office of Radiation Protection (BfS) have been released for all Nucleonica users.
– The transport application e-Ship++ has been updated to include Transport Security Thresholds
– A new Training application has been developed for support to the Nucleonica Training Courses.
NN-2020

Best wishes for 2020,
Sincerely yours,
Joseph Magill
Managing Director

More information…
Nucleonica Newsletter 2020
Previous Newsletters
Nucleonica Newsletter 2019
Nucleonica Newsletter 2018
Nucleonica Newsletter 2017
Nucleonica Newsletter 2016
Nucleonica Newsletter 2015
Nucleonica Newsletter 2014
Nucleonica Newsletter 2013
Nucleonica Newsletter 2012

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Nucleonica Physical Constants updated to 2018 CODATA recommended values

August 13th, 2019

The values of the physical constants used in Nucleonica are recommended by CODATA and are the latest available. Termed the “2018 CODATA recommended values” they are recognized worldwide for use in science and technology. The values became available on 20 May 2019 and replaced the 2014 CODATA set. They are based on all data available until 31 December 2018.NewPCs-2019Of particular important to the Nucleonica applications, IUPAC is recommending a new definition of the mole based on a specified number of elementary entities:
The mole, symbol mol, is the SI unit of amount of substance. One mole contains exactly 6.022 140 76 × 1023 elementary entities. This number is the fixed numerical value of the Avogadro constant, NA, when expressed in mol−1, and is called the Avogadro number.
More information
2019 redefinition of the SI base units
A new definition for the mole based on the Avogadro constant
A NEW DEFINITION OF THE MOLE HAS ARRIVED (IUPAC)

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Metastable states in the Karslruhe Nuclide Chart

July 24th, 2019

Qu. (from M. R. KTE Karlsruhe, Germany):
Dear Nucleonica Team,
I have always wondered what the criteria are to show the metastable state of a nuclide on the chart. The first guess would be the half life of the state. But I found for example the nuclide Rn-214 which shows a metastable state of only 0,69 ns. Is there an arbitrary threshold just below that number where you show the state on the chart if it is above? If the threshold depends on the half life, is there a scientific reason for that threshold? Are all states shown that are above that threshold?
Rn214Ans. (Nucleonica Team)
Metastable states, which do not undergo alpha or beta decays or spontaneous fission, i.e. decay only by isomeric transition are shown (usually) only if their half-life is larger than 1 s (to save space).

Rn 214 excited states Rn 214m and Rn 214n have been observed, both with alpha decay to Po 210. Although their half-lives are less than 1s they are shown in KNC. In this way the users of KNC can know that the alpha emission is not from the ground state of Rn 214 and can have higher energy than the Q-value of ground state to ground state decay.
In some particular cases when the metastable state has an important role in a decay chain or in nuclear physics theory, it is presented even it decays only with isomeric transition and has a half-life shorter than 1s.
There is an interesting article on wikipedia.

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New publication on the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart

May 27th, 2019

Obtaining nuclear data is an international activity with new and updated data constantly being determined by thousands of scientists at major research centres worldwide. Because of the large amounts of data generated and the formats used to store these data, the field of nuclear data is highly specialised. To make the most important key data more accessible to a wider audience, nuclide charts have been developed. In this publication, we present the scientific highlights of the new 10th Edition of the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart.
Fig1epjn The main focus of this Chart is to provide structured, accurate information on the half-lives and decay modes, as well as energies of the emitted radiation for over 4000 experimentally observed ground states and isomer nuclides to an interdisciplinary audience.

More information…
Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart – New 10th edition 2018, EPJ Nuclear Sci. Technol.
Volume 5, 2019
(pdf)
New 10th Edition (2018) of the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart
Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart Online Shop

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World’s oldest periodic table chart found in St Andrews

January 22nd, 2019

A periodic table discovered at the University of St Andrews is thought to be the oldest in the world. Following Menedleev’s famous discovery of periodicity in the chemical elements in 1869, a number of such periodic tables were created. The St. Andrews periodic table is similar to Mendeleev’s second table from 1871. Original_PT2Periodic Table discovered at St. Andrews University, Scotland (Courtesy St. Andrews University).
The United Nations has designated 2019 as the international year of the Periodic Table of chemical elements, recognizing it as an instrument ‘central to linking cultural, economic and political aspects of the global society through a common language’.

More info…
St. Andrews University News
Article in Der Spiegel (in German)
United Nations Year of the Periodic Table

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Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart (Contour Chart) at URENCO, Netherlands

January 14th, 2019

Nucleonica has arranged the installation of a “contour” version of the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart at the URENCO premises in Almelo, Netherlands.
The Chart was produced using a 4mm Dibond aluminium plate “cut-out” to fit in a space of height 2m and width 5m and assembled a small distance from the wall. The text is cut from adhesive foil and glued directly on the wall.
UERENCO_KNC_2018Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart (Contour Chart) at the URENCO premises in the Netherlands, Courtesy URENCO. For further information, contact info@nucleonica.com.

More information…
Other print versions of the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart
Nuclide Charts
Contour Nuclide Chart for European Dialogue Centre

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Nucleonica Newsletter 2019

January 6th, 2019

Dear Nucleonica Users,
Hopefully you had a great start into the New Year, and we wish you every success in 2019. For the Nucleonica Team, a major focus over the past year was the development and improvement of new and existing applications. Detailed information on these activities is described in this Newsletter.
A highlight in 2018 was the launch of the new 10th Edition of the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart in early 2018. You can order your copy here.
A further highlight was the development of a new online e-Learning Training Centre, making the Nucleonica product knowledge more transparent and accessible.
NN2019The Nucleonica Team would like to thank you for your continued support.
Best wishes for 2019, Sincerely yours,
Joseph Magill, Managing Director

More information…
Nucleonica Newsletter 2019
Previous Newsletters
Nucleonica Newsletter 2018
Nucleonica Newsletter 2017
Nucleonica Newsletter 2016
Nucleonica Newsletter 2015
Nucleonica Newsletter 2014
Nucleonica Newsletter 2013
Nucleonica Newsletter 2012

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